Maker&Made

for the artistic of mind and the mindfully artistic

thats-not-victorian:

lilith-et-adalia:

Thought this might be a little helpful, we hope it’s not wrong!!

And just for a little added context:

  • Elizabethan:  refers to Elizabeth I, who reigned from 1558 to 1603 (this is part of the Tudor era, as well)
  • Baroque:  an art movement that began around 1600 and lasted until the early 18th century.  
  • Rococo: an art movement created in a direct response to Baroque (sometimes called “Late Baroque”), which lasted from about the 1710s to around the time of the French Revolution (depending on the historian you ask).
  • Georgian:  refers to the rules of Georges I, II, III, and IV (1714 to 1830).  
  • Regency:  the time when George IV ascended the throne due to his father’s mental illness.  It technically lasted from 1811 to 1820, but some will use this term for all pre-Victorian 19th century.  
  • Victorian:  Queen Victoria’s reign from 1837 to 1901 (but will sometimes be considered to start earlier due to the Reform Act of 1832)

(Source: Lilith-et-Adalia, via titians-ambition)

nativeamericannews:

Original Seattle Seahawk Found! (No, It’s Not Steve Largent)With the Super Bowl just around the corner, the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture has done some research on the Seattle Seahawks’ beloved and Native-inspired Seahawk logo, and you don’t have to be an expert to conclude they’ve foud the exact piece it was modeled on.

nativeamericannews:

Original Seattle Seahawk Found! (No, It’s Not Steve Largent)

With the Super Bowl just around the corner, the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture has done some research on the Seattle Seahawks’ beloved and Native-inspired Seahawk logo, and you don’t have to be an expert to conclude they’ve foud the exact piece it was modeled on.

(Source: indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com)

inspiration for crowns & tiaras

"queens crowned in golden-jeweled halos, rule like angels among demons. their eyes shine like ethereal emeralds and stunning sapphires."

(via fuckyeahharrypotter)

notmodernart:

centuriespast:

The earliest unfinished European painting on display at the Met right now, in Gallery 640, is a real knockout: “Virgin and Child With Saints” by a Flemish artist referred to as the Ghent Painter (who might be Hugo van der Goes or Jean Hey). This exquisite oil-on-wood image demonstrates one of the stranger ways that a work can be, or in this case become, unfinished. Completed around 1472 in the meticulously realist style perfected by Jan van Eyck (1390-1441), the painting was modified in the early 17th century to depict the marriage of Henry VII to Elizabeth of York. The Virgin and Child in the center and St. John the Baptist to the left of them were scraped off and replaced, respectively, with a central view into a cathedral and the bride. The lavishly dressed St. Louis (himself a king) on the far right became Henry with a few adjustments in crown and gown.
The painting, which entered the Met’s collection in 1889, was restored in 1983; the added images and details were removed, revealing the nearly intact ink drawing of the Virgin and Child and partial sketches of St. John. Having been finished and refinished, the restored work is now unfinished, providing a glimpse of the preparatory precision of Flemish painters, and also looking, on first sight, very much like a collage.
— Roberta Snith, NYT 1/10/14

The coolest thing

notmodernart:

centuriespast:

The earliest unfinished European painting on display at the Met right now, in Gallery 640, is a real knockout: “Virgin and Child With Saints” by a Flemish artist referred to as the Ghent Painter (who might be Hugo van der Goes or Jean Hey). This exquisite oil-on-wood image demonstrates one of the stranger ways that a work can be, or in this case become, unfinished. Completed around 1472 in the meticulously realist style perfected by Jan van Eyck (1390-1441), the painting was modified in the early 17th century to depict the marriage of Henry VII to Elizabeth of York. The Virgin and Child in the center and St. John the Baptist to the left of them were scraped off and replaced, respectively, with a central view into a cathedral and the bride. The lavishly dressed St. Louis (himself a king) on the far right became Henry with a few adjustments in crown and gown.

The painting, which entered the Met’s collection in 1889, was restored in 1983; the added images and details were removed, revealing the nearly intact ink drawing of the Virgin and Child and partial sketches of St. John. Having been finished and refinished, the restored work is now unfinished, providing a glimpse of the preparatory precision of Flemish painters, and also looking, on first sight, very much like a collage.

— Roberta Snith, NYT 1/10/14

The coolest thing

(Source: The New York Times, via caravaggista)

friendly reminder that benedict poured water for martin first before he poured one for himself

[ x ]

(Source: darlingbenny, via bbcssherlock)

madhistory:


Jeu de la Bataille ou le Buffon amusant [early 19th century]
SG 3102.106.1
Houghton Library, Harvard University

-houghtonlib

madhistory:

Jeu de la Bataille ou le Buffon amusant [early 19th century]

SG 3102.106.1

Houghton Library, Harvard University

-houghtonlib